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thanks you's all around: a blog year in photos

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By Jen White · August 1, 2012 · 0 Comments ·

Above: one of the tastiest parts of the year: Alon Shaya's charcuterie and relishes.

It was just over a year ago that I decided to get to work.  I mean really work, and I mean on this here blog.  I started it in 2008, but I tended to just piddle around on it every few months.  Last summer, I had a break from work and a need to do something creative and writerly for myself, and I channelled just about all my energy into blogging.  It's been an amazing year, some parts of which still make me pinch myself.  

Dear readers, thank you so much for coming along for the ride.  Thank you for reading my blog, for commenting and sharing your thoughts. Thanks for directing your friends and coworkers here, for recommending it to travelers looking for good places to go.  Thank you for inspiring me with your own awesome blogs and food photos.  Thanks for following Food Orleans through Facebook, Twitter, OnSugar, email, Pinterest, and RSS feeds. Cheers!

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the summeriest of snacks: fried whole okra with remoulade

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By Jen White · June 13, 2012 · 0 Comments ·

The other day, in the midst of a marathon 4-day wedding weekend, Paul and I took some out-of-town friends to The Company Burger so they could revel in its deliciousness.  As always, the bacon-and-egg burgers and mayonnaise bar at Company didn't disappoint.  But we also got to try one of their vegetable specials, fried whole okra with a vinegar pepper sauce.  it was a revelation, and I haven't been able to get it off my okra-loving mind: lightly battered, crisp little bites of the summertime garden.  The spicy vinegar was great for dipping, but I wanted to try something a little more clingy on them, and I think this remoulade is a good match.  Remoulade (a zippy little mayonnaise-based sauce commonly served with shrimp in New Orleans) will perk up just about any vegetable, whether it's grilled, roasted, steamed, fried, or just plain raw.  

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Tagged with: remoulade, Tempura, okra, fried, snack

different than the rest: sunday brunch at Patois

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By Jen White · September 28, 2011 · 0 Comments ·

Jot this down in your travel notebook, your vacation planner, your dream journal, or last year's Jazz Fest ticket: reserve a table for Sunday brunch at Patois next time in New Orleans.  If you're into local, good, and hidden, Patois is your dream spot.  The brunch menu (not to mention the dinner version) is so good, you'll spend about 15 minutes deciding what to order while you're nibbling the biscuits and muffins from the bread bowl.  We looked over many brunch menus before deciding to meet up at Patois, and I think it was one of the best brunches we've had in the city.

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little crispy bits: salad with fried okra croutons and buttermilk dressing

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By Jen White · August 8, 2011 · 0 Comments ·

I love little fried bits of things--shrimp, hushpuppies, onion rings, green tomatoes--but I've found a new favorite thing to satisfy that crunch-crunch, home-fried crispy urge.  It's fried okra.  Growing up, I never used to go for it, while the rest of my family inhaled it by the handful, especially when it came from my Southern-cooking grandma's kitchen.  I think okra had too much of a deep, earthen,  brown taste...it was bitter, like Brussels sprouts. It seemed, to my palate accustomed to raspberry Zingers and spaghettios, almost burnt.  Of course now I can't seem to get enough, and I think it's the oddness of okra that I find so wonderful.  There's really nothing else quite like it.

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summer's last stand: shrimp and okra stew with a secret

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By Jen White · August 1, 2011 · 0 Comments ·

Before the intense heat of this summer drives us all inside to eat nothing but cold sandwiches and ice cream, and before every last tomato has been incinerated by the sun, I want to share a special creation with you that we concocted at the beach: shrimp and okra stew with a secret.  The secret is chipotle pepper. (Italics is the typist's whisper).  Not that chipotle peppers in adobo sauce haven't been popularized in recent years--they're showing up in everything from hot wing sauce to salad dressing--but they're not indigenous to New Orleans cuisine.  But they really put this shrimp and okra stew over the top, I tell you!  Wowza!

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from Mondo with love

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By Jen White · September 12, 2010 · 0 Comments ·

I'm going to keep this simple: I believe it's impossible for anyone to not like Mondo.  Susan Spicer's intent with this new restaurant, located in Lakeview, was that every diner would find something to his or her taste, and the carefully crafted menu accomplishes this task.  It might be true that any restaurant serving pizza can boast that it satisfies even finicky eaters.  But what Mondo does is sneak subtle culinary lessons into even the tamest plates, so that nonadventurous patrons will feel satisfied and enlightened at the same time.  Here are some examples, from our first Mondo visit, of the easy-to-enjoy twists put on comfortable classics.  First, our snack of caramel-bacon popcorn:

Do you like caramel corn? Then you like caramel-bacon corn.

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3 B's and a C: Butcher, Bud's Broiler, B Side, and Charlie's

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By Jen White · August 14, 2010 · 0 Comments ·

Note: The title of this post is not a report card.  It's just my attempt at being clever. The report card would be all A's, for real.

It's been a little busy around the Food Orleans household this month, but that doesn't mean we haven't been eating.  Here are some photos and brief reviews of places we've checked out over the summer.

B #1:  Butcher.  Donald Link's Butcher is located next door to his Cajun-oriented Cochon, in the warehouse district.  It's a true butcher shop, where you can buy delectable pork cuts, poultry, lamb, beef, foie gras, and housemade sausages of all kinds, but it also has a bar and little tables and fantastic food.  Butcher has become one of our must-try places we like to take out-of-town guests to, and everyone loves it.  They have a full sandwich board (and the best muffaletta in town--you heard me), but my favorite thing to do is order three or four of their small plates--usually $6 each--and a plate of their boudin with mustard and pickles--only $3.  The menu changes constantly, but always includes a couple of options for those who don't eat pig and is always seasonal.

Butcher: boudin-stuffed quail atop braised greens and creamy mustard.

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